Acknowledgements.

   The Motor Museum in Miniature is fortunate to have many good friends who, over the years, have donated kits, built models and memorabilia to the Museum collection. The reasons for this vary from a desire to help through to ensuring a friend or family member is remembered, and their models/items are kept safe, after their passing. 

   After the first point we need all the help we can get to tell the story of automotive history, it is a huge subject covering many areas. As for the second point, and we can't get away from this fact, we are all going to die. We have heard stories of peoples models being thrown away because their family didn't know what to do with them. The loss of years of passion, knowledge and skill is so sad, the least we can do is remember our friends through their models and see that their passion can continue to inspire others.

   It is fitting to remember all those who have contributed to the museum display and website history albums, whatever the reasons. As such this page is dedicated to those who support us in so many different ways, and to those who have left us to do their model making in another dimension.


   Please accept our most humble and grateful thanks.


Alec Chinnery

Alex Payne.

Bryan Phillips

Derek Bonas.

Dick Smith.

Graham Whitehead.

Jim Maher

John Boucker.

John Jenkins.

John Lewis.

John MacDonald

Kit Carson

Mark Reeves.

Mike Slack.

Randy Candy Customs

Richard Griffiths

Richard Middleton

Roy Poulter.

Tony Jones.


   It is our dream to one day find a proper, permanent home for the Museum collection. A place where anyone can come and see the world of motoring, in miniature. A place where schools and students can visit to see the importance of transport through history and for a view on the way the internal combustion engine has affected our lives and the world we live in.

   The motor car could not have been possible without steps (or huge leaps) in a variety of sciences and occupations. Metallurgy, chemistry, manufacturing and engineering were all linked into the move to find a reliable power source, and then a cart strong enough and light enough to move under it's own power. Once the motor car was a practical item (and spurred on by changes during the first world war) it had a big effect on sociology and urban development.

   More than that at a proper Museum would be a place where people can also learn about our hobby and find the anoraks are hung at the door, not walking around in the room.

Kindest regards,

Rod & Ian